3 Great Interactive Marketing Campaigns with RFID and Facebook

I am a big admirer of new technology and its application in marketing, especially when the result is a novel and remarkable user experience. The use of Radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology and Facebook in interactive marketing campaigns is a combination that creates such an effect.

Recently, I have been researching a bit more about this technology and the possibilities it can bring to the field of marketing and communication. And I managed to find a few really interesting cases which I think are worth sharing.

Below you will see three campaigns from the automotive, drinks and holiday industries.

Renault

The first one is a case by Renault. Earlier in the year, Renault participated in the Amsterdam auto show in The Netherlands. Visitors to their stand were able to interact in a quite unusual way and to connect their online and offline worlds. And all of this with just a plastic card…well not exactly, as you can see from this video:

Coca-Cola

The second case features Coca Cola and their Summer Village initiative organised in Israel. The organisers were able to find a great and entertaining way to let the teenage visitors to share their experience in the real world with their friends online. And all of that with the help of a bracelet…and a chip, and Facebook of course. Here’s the video:

Ushuaia Beach Hotel

The third case comes from a very warm and sunny place – Ibiza. The Mediterranean island becomes the party centre of Europe for three months every year. As a result of that local clubs are faced with the big challenge of attracting the attention of the visitors. If you have been to Ibiza you can’t have missed all the people inviting you to parties in random clubs and all the other crazy ways they’ve come up with over the years to attract your attention. Well, this year, the Ushuaia beach hotel and club found a great way to stand out from the crowd. Again with the help of a few simple tools. Take a look:

All these cases and the speed at which agencies are adopting the innovation bring me a sense of encouragement that very exciting times are ahead for all of us involved in digital communications. I’m really looking forward to more creative uses of this technology by marketing and communication professionals!

Advertisements

My admiration for Posterous

Recently, I started working on a new project about Formula One Marketing. It’s a blog where I present my thoughts and share news regarding developments in the world of F1.

To set up the blog I considered several platforms and decided to go with something new. So, I chose Posterous and I must say that it is a really great and simple to use tool. In fact, its simplicity and ability to post “on-the-go” are the two features that really sold it to me.

Great email functionality

You can set up your blog just by sending an email and later, you can maintain your blog just through email. The platform also has a nice little app for iPhone (also works on the iPad, although not as well) which lets you publish new content in just a couple of easy steps.

Design

The designs you can choose for your blogs are also great and have a nice minimalistic feel to them – usually, they include a single-colour background and a nice font-type that fits quite well with it. And this is also very simple to set up.

Pages

Pages and links are easily uploaded as well. By going through the main settings page, you can set them up in almost no time.

Analytics

Another great feature about Posterous is the ability to quickly set up a feedburner subscription system and connect the site with Google Analytics. Gaining thorough insights about the project is extremely important to me and with Analytics I can easily get access to such information.

It’s very social!

Furthermore, Posterous offers its users to connect their blogs to the big social networks – Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn. This way you can set up the “autopost” feature, so that your new content is shared on all your social channels (and later you have the ability to repost with just a click of a button). This feature also allows you to connect with your friends or followers and subscribe to their Posterous feeds (in case they have one). And all that, again, with just a click of a button.

To sum up, Posterous is a great platform for bloggers who are looking for a simple tool where they can quickly and easily share their thoughts, supported with all kinds of media (photos, videos, sound recordings).

Commenting on blogs

A lot has been written around the web about commenting on blogs. And it seems that this is an ongoing discussion which will not end soon because our attitudes and behaviours online are constantly evolving – in line with all the new technological advancements that seem to occur on a daily basis. Recently, I had a similar discussion with my friend Katina Kostova. We talked about the reasons why some people barely (if at all) comment on blogs? In our short correspondence several points are worth mentioning here, I think.

First, there is the fact that majority of active online users are only consumers of information. They are not looking for a discussion on a certain topic or to build relationships with the writers. And if they want to react to what they’ve just read, it is much easier to click on the “share” button and continue to the next post or article. To tackle this behaviour, readers need to show discipline and start to comment on a regular basis. Given enough time this activity will become almost like a habit. Leaving comments on a regular basis will leave an impression with the other participants in the conversation who will start to recognize the name of the commenter.

Second, there seems to be a trend in shifting the discussion from the blogs to other social networks like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Sharing through these platforms takes much less time, it’s easier to write a short note with the link than writing a long comment in the blog, and the chance that more people will be exposed to the note/comment is higher.

Third, there might be some psychological barriers to commenting on blogs. Some people might be afraid of confrontation or scared of insulting the author. They might prefer to share their opinion and critique privately – directly to the author, rather than stating them openly in the public. Furthermore, the person writing the comment might feel uncertain or insecure. One might not feel competent enough about the topic or as knowledgeable as the other participants who are leaving comments and simply avoid joining the conversation.

These are some of the reasons we covered in our short talk. I am sure that there are other reasons that stop people from commenting on blogs. I would love to hear from you and read your own thoughts on the subject.

Timing in the online world matters – lessons from Dan Zarella

Today we are bombarded with content from everywhere. Especially online. Everyone who is actively participating on the internet is competing for our attention. Both content creators and curators are interacting intensely through various means like email, social networks, blogs, etc. And it is becoming more and more easily to start feeling overwhelmed and lost in all this information. Therefore, it is essential to understand and plan carefully when and how you are taking part in these exchanges.

Fortunately, a couple of days ago, Dan Zarella – the social media scientist working at HubSpot, presented his recent findings on “the science of timing” in a great webinar. I’ve been following Dan for quite some time and took part in several of his webinars as a result of which I’ve gained important understanding about the world of social media, email and blogging.

As I said, the webinar I’ll point out in this post is about timing. Timing regarding social networks, email and blogging activity. Here are some of the main points from Dan’s presentation (or takeaways as he prefers to call them):

Social media:

– Retweeting happens most during the afternoon, mostly between 12PM and 6PM
– Tweeting more on a regular basis during the week, don’t worry that your followers will be overwhelmed by your tweets – this will also help you increase the number of followers
– However, if you are looking to gain more clicks to your own content (webpage, blog) make sure you don’t bury these links in other updates you are tweeting/retweeting
– If you are focusing on spreading your content on Facebook, share links during the weekend

Email:

– People read email most frequently during mornings, therefore posting early in the morning increases the chance of your message to be read
– Experiment with emailing over the weekend – open and click rates are higher at that time, yet bounces and abuse reports are also higher. Email gets most attention on the weekends
– Sending more emails increases the click-through rates and decreases unsubscribe levels
– Newest subscribers are the best – they are likely to remember you best and have higher interest in your email

Blogging:

-Similar to email, blogs are most read during the morning, yet one must not underestimate that 40% of people still read blogs at night
– People read more blogs during weekdays
– Yet if you want to have more comments, try blogging over the weekends – people are more inclined to join your discussions on Saturdays and Sundays
– People who link to your content are most active early in the morning, during the week
– More frequent blogging will result in more views and linking

These are in brief the major points of the webinar. One thing you should note is that the times used in the presentation are according to the EST time zone, but I believe that the same time frames can be related to time zones within Europe.

Here is an interesting tool by HubSpot which will show you your most retweetable times and days:

http://TweetWhen.com

And here is Dan’s presentation on the science of timing:

Going back to basics

Slowly, but surely, we are going back to basics. With the help of social media, of course. There has been a lot of talk recently about privacy concerns and there were a lot of complaints from users as well. However, I believe that such attitudes exist mainly because of people’s lack of understanding of what social media is about. Services like these are still considered “the new thing” by majority of users (but also non-users) and it is a well-known fact that people tend to resist change and express reservations of the unfamiliar, of what they can’t really understand.

Privacy - from Latin: privatus "separated from the rest, deprived of something"

Continue reading

Using Facebook to achieve personal change

How much time do you spend on Facebook? If you are a frequent user you might have noticed how your day begins and ends with the social network. You wake up, switch on your computer and quickly go online to connect with the world, people, companies and other organisations, and post some content to make your presence known. In the meantime, you go through your day and daily tasks at home or at work (or maybe both) and later in the evening you wrap-up your day by scanning through what has been posted on Facebook. Then you log out and go to sleep…

This morning, just after I woke up and opened Facebook I found out this short film, created by Maxime Luere, that tells the life story of a guy just by scrolling through his Facebook wall.


Continue reading