LinkedIn Needs a Better Notification System

I am a regular user of LInkedIn and rely on the service to build and maintain a strong professional network. There is, however, a very significant problem with the site: their notification system.

So far the system displays notifications only for new messages and invitations. It does not send notifications when someone comments on your status update or when a new connection has accepted your request.

These are major drawbacks that are limiting the ability to have conversations among contacts within the site.

Not having a well-functioning notification system is one of the reasons a lot of people don’t spend more time on the site. I believe that a system which is more similar to the one Facebook has – comprehensive and customizable – will prove to be of great benefit to the website.

Notifications for group discussions can also be improved. At the moment, LinkedIn sends you all these emails which fill your inbox. I have filtered all the messages coming from LinkedIn a long time ago. Therefore, I may miss important announcements, but I prefer this than having my inbox cluttered. If users are noted about group activity through a notification system instead of emails it will make life much easier. At least that’s how I see it.

How about you? Are you a frequent LinkedIn user and would you like to see an improved notification system? Do you have other suggestions on how it can be improved?

Advertisements

My admiration for Posterous

Recently, I started working on a new project about Formula One Marketing. It’s a blog where I present my thoughts and share news regarding developments in the world of F1.

To set up the blog I considered several platforms and decided to go with something new. So, I chose Posterous and I must say that it is a really great and simple to use tool. In fact, its simplicity and ability to post “on-the-go” are the two features that really sold it to me.

Great email functionality

You can set up your blog just by sending an email and later, you can maintain your blog just through email. The platform also has a nice little app for iPhone (also works on the iPad, although not as well) which lets you publish new content in just a couple of easy steps.

Design

The designs you can choose for your blogs are also great and have a nice minimalistic feel to them – usually, they include a single-colour background and a nice font-type that fits quite well with it. And this is also very simple to set up.

Pages

Pages and links are easily uploaded as well. By going through the main settings page, you can set them up in almost no time.

Analytics

Another great feature about Posterous is the ability to quickly set up a feedburner subscription system and connect the site with Google Analytics. Gaining thorough insights about the project is extremely important to me and with Analytics I can easily get access to such information.

It’s very social!

Furthermore, Posterous offers its users to connect their blogs to the big social networks – Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn. This way you can set up the “autopost” feature, so that your new content is shared on all your social channels (and later you have the ability to repost with just a click of a button). This feature also allows you to connect with your friends or followers and subscribe to their Posterous feeds (in case they have one). And all that, again, with just a click of a button.

To sum up, Posterous is a great platform for bloggers who are looking for a simple tool where they can quickly and easily share their thoughts, supported with all kinds of media (photos, videos, sound recordings).

Commenting on blogs

A lot has been written around the web about commenting on blogs. And it seems that this is an ongoing discussion which will not end soon because our attitudes and behaviours online are constantly evolving – in line with all the new technological advancements that seem to occur on a daily basis. Recently, I had a similar discussion with my friend Katina Kostova. We talked about the reasons why some people barely (if at all) comment on blogs? In our short correspondence several points are worth mentioning here, I think.

First, there is the fact that majority of active online users are only consumers of information. They are not looking for a discussion on a certain topic or to build relationships with the writers. And if they want to react to what they’ve just read, it is much easier to click on the “share” button and continue to the next post or article. To tackle this behaviour, readers need to show discipline and start to comment on a regular basis. Given enough time this activity will become almost like a habit. Leaving comments on a regular basis will leave an impression with the other participants in the conversation who will start to recognize the name of the commenter.

Second, there seems to be a trend in shifting the discussion from the blogs to other social networks like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Sharing through these platforms takes much less time, it’s easier to write a short note with the link than writing a long comment in the blog, and the chance that more people will be exposed to the note/comment is higher.

Third, there might be some psychological barriers to commenting on blogs. Some people might be afraid of confrontation or scared of insulting the author. They might prefer to share their opinion and critique privately – directly to the author, rather than stating them openly in the public. Furthermore, the person writing the comment might feel uncertain or insecure. One might not feel competent enough about the topic or as knowledgeable as the other participants who are leaving comments and simply avoid joining the conversation.

These are some of the reasons we covered in our short talk. I am sure that there are other reasons that stop people from commenting on blogs. I would love to hear from you and read your own thoughts on the subject.

Integrating social media within the organisation

Integrating social media within all departments and educating employees about it are important tasks each organisation must undertake in order to survive, stay relevant and benefit in today’s world. These interrelated processes of integration and education can create communication opportunities for your organisation – both internally and externally.

Internally, it will facilitate a better understanding of organisational culture, goals and new developments. Employees who are taking part in various social networks can connect with each other and move online the discussions they have during their lunch or coffee brake. They might talk about personal topics, but also cover subjects about their employer, the business day and other activities surrounding the organisation.

Externally, your employees will be “out there” in the online world where your past, current and potential customers are. They all become contacts to the organisation and also, its ambassadors. People interested about new products or job opportunities, for instance, can find your employees and approach them at any time. And both parties can start an interaction that can greatly benefit the organisation and its customers.

In fact, there is a big opportunity here. First, by integrating and educating about social media within the borders of your organisation, your employees have the opportunity to see the big picture and understand better who and why are they working for such an organisation. And second, because your employees can now become more engaged with and know better the organisation – they are more likely to positively portray it to the outside world. And I don’t mean just the online, but also the real, physical, world.

A recent development, brought out yesterday by LinkedIn, will stress the importance of integration and education about social media within organisations. The network is allowing it’s users to use new sharing features on their personal and corporate websites. Profile and company badges that show who works for your organisation can now be added to your webpage. Follow this link to learn more about these new tools.

Transparency has become an inherent feature of the successful modern organisation. I don’t think any organisation can avoid being transparent now. Of course, there are certain things that will always stay private and within the borders of organisations (and they should be). But the communication reality is changing, or should I say evolving, constantly to more and higher levels of openness.