Finding a rhythm

Rhythm, according to Wikipedia is “any regular recurring motion, symmetry.”

Finding a rhythm is essential when you are doing sports. If you find your own rhythm while doing sports you will be able to avoid a burn out and you will have much more fun exercising.

Finding a rhythm for your digital activity and habits is just as important. It will prevent you from feeling overwhelmed and fed-up with social media and constantly trying to be “present.” It will also make social media much more fun.

Finding a rhythm will liberate you from thinking about your digital activities as choruses and will help you reach balance and regularity, and to enjoy your presence in the online world.

(PS: I was wondering what kind of picture would go well with this post, but I think this song will make reading the post much more enjoyable;) )

Advertisements

Commenting on blogs

A lot has been written around the web about commenting on blogs. And it seems that this is an ongoing discussion which will not end soon because our attitudes and behaviours online are constantly evolving – in line with all the new technological advancements that seem to occur on a daily basis. Recently, I had a similar discussion with my friend Katina Kostova. We talked about the reasons why some people barely (if at all) comment on blogs? In our short correspondence several points are worth mentioning here, I think.

First, there is the fact that majority of active online users are only consumers of information. They are not looking for a discussion on a certain topic or to build relationships with the writers. And if they want to react to what they’ve just read, it is much easier to click on the “share” button and continue to the next post or article. To tackle this behaviour, readers need to show discipline and start to comment on a regular basis. Given enough time this activity will become almost like a habit. Leaving comments on a regular basis will leave an impression with the other participants in the conversation who will start to recognize the name of the commenter.

Second, there seems to be a trend in shifting the discussion from the blogs to other social networks like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Sharing through these platforms takes much less time, it’s easier to write a short note with the link than writing a long comment in the blog, and the chance that more people will be exposed to the note/comment is higher.

Third, there might be some psychological barriers to commenting on blogs. Some people might be afraid of confrontation or scared of insulting the author. They might prefer to share their opinion and critique privately – directly to the author, rather than stating them openly in the public. Furthermore, the person writing the comment might feel uncertain or insecure. One might not feel competent enough about the topic or as knowledgeable as the other participants who are leaving comments and simply avoid joining the conversation.

These are some of the reasons we covered in our short talk. I am sure that there are other reasons that stop people from commenting on blogs. I would love to hear from you and read your own thoughts on the subject.

The importance of patience when using Twitter!

Do you recognise this bird?

A couple of years ago I signed up for a relatively unknown service. It allowed submission of personalised status-like messages to an audience of followers. The message I was allowed to post had to be fitted within a limit of 140 characters. I decided for myself that I will give it a try.

Several years later and I cannot imagine a day go by without spending at least an hour going through my twitter feed and interacting with the small community I have created there. The invaluable information and ability to get in touch with each user of the service are things I cannot do without. But it took me quite some time until I started utilising Twitter to it’s full potential. In fact, I know that there is still quite some way to go before I actually become a truly active and engaged user.
Continue reading